The Official Breakside Beer Blog – Breakside Brewery https://www.breakside.com We Love Beer Fri, 16 Feb 2018 20:30:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.breakside.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/cropped-BSB-SeekerLogo-SE-1C-K-32x32.jpg The Official Breakside Beer Blog – Breakside Brewery https://www.breakside.com 32 32 Back to the Future: Looking Into our Crystal Ball about what’s next in IPAs https://www.breakside.com/back-to-the-future-looking-into-our-crystal-ball-about-whats-next-in-ipas/ Mon, 18 Jul 2016 01:26:53 +0000 https://www.breakside.com/?p=4155 Back to the Future IPA (aka BTTF) is the third release in our series of rotating draft-only IPAs for the year. BTTF is a departure from the previous two releases in the series: Tall Guy IPA and Rainbows & Unicorns. Those two are beers we’ve brewed a number of times and have more or less... Continue reading »

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Back to the Future IPA (aka BTTF) is the third release in our series of rotating draft-only IPAs for the year. BTTF is a departure from the previous two releases in the series: Tall Guy IPA and Rainbows & Unicorns. Those two are beers we’ve brewed a number of times and have more or less “set” recipes. By contrast, Back to the Future is a beer that always changes, both each year and– in this year’s incarnations– each batch.

Breakside-Brewery-Back-to-the-Future-IPAWe first brewed this beer in 2015 as a cross-border collaboration with our friends at Fremont Brewing in Seattle. The idea was to brew similar-yet-distinct beers for Seattle and Portland Beer Week using varietals that we thought might be the “next hot hop.” When we brewed that beer, we also incorporated a lot of other ideas that we had about new ways to make IPAs that weren’t directly connected to hops as well.

Specifically, we used BTTF 2015 to explore some questions we had about the use of flaked grains in IPAs. We also trialed a much softer water profile than we normally use with our IPAs. As with any trial, there were parts of the 2015 version that we liked and learned from, and elements that we didn’t. The things that we liked are now incorporated into many of our other hoppy beers. Both Lunch Break and Tall Guy use a good portion of flaked barley in the malt bill, for example. The hops that we used BTTF 2015– Ella and Azacca– have both found a home in our hop schedules for several other beers, including Hop Delivery Mechanism and Imperial Red.

This year, we’ve revived BTTF in the same spirit, brewing it with combinations of hops that we think have a lot of promise and using this beer as an opportunity for us to explore some “new directions” in making IPAs. Distilling it down to 3 key areas, this year’s Back to the Future IPAs are exploring the following territory:
Pairing a new and interesting hop (Topaz, Lemondrop, Idaho 7) with hops that are already beloved (Mosaic, Citra, and Ella). Each batch of this beer focuses on a different combination of those hops. The first batch, which is currently on the market, is heavy on Topaz and Mosaic. The second round of brews will be mainly Citra and Lemondrop. The final batches– the ones that will be hitting the market in August– will use Ella and Idaho 7.

We are using a different yeast strain with this beer this year, and it seems to respond to American hops differently than our normal house ale strain. Many East Coast brewers have been featuring English yeast strains in their hoppy beers; in our case, we’re seeing what happens by brewing an IPA with a Kolsch-type yeast strain.

Finally, the malt: as most any fan of Breakside knows, we like making austere IPAs. Wanderlust is a great example of this– it’s just Two Row and Munich malt. In the last year or two we’ve played a lot with flaked grains and also with “bigger bodied” hoppy beers (the latter due to the influence of our friends at Fat Head’s), so we wanted to get back to our roots with this and focus on a very simple grain bill. BTTF is composed entirely of American Two Row and British Golden Promise malts. The challenge when using only base malts in an American hoppy beer is that the lack of character and crystal malts can cause bitterness to be more pronounced. So, we’ve really tried to figure out what the optimal balance between IBUs and malt is for BTTF.

 
We’re pretty excited to test and taste these new ideas, and based on the response to the first batch, our customers seem excited about it too. Back to the Future will be available on draft through the end of September at Breakside’s pub and taproom as well as at select accounts in OR, WA, BC, HI, and Northern CA. If you try this beer at one of our spots, be sure to ask about which version is on tap; many bars and restaurants that get a keg may not know which version the beer is, but they can always reference the batch number for the curious-minded, and you can check it against the list of batches below.

Cheers!
-Ben

Back to the Future 2016 Batch #s and Hop Variants
#529: Topaz and Mosaic (currently out to market)
#537: Lemondrop and Citra (will be released to market 7/20)
#545: Lemondrop and Citra (due to release ~8/1)
#TBD: Idaho 7 and Ella (due to release ~8/25)

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Collaboration brews with Lewis & Clark College https://www.breakside.com/collaboration-brews-with-lewis-clark-college/ Wed, 20 Apr 2016 20:45:56 +0000 https://www.breakside.com/?p=3953 For the past 3 years, Breakside Brewery and Lewis & Clark College have partnered to offer a course in brewing and the business of beer for students interested in the craft beer industry. Sponsored by Lewis & Clark’s Center for Entrepreneurship, the course is instructed by Breakside brewmaster Ben Edmunds and R&D brewer Will Jaquiss.... Continue reading »

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For the past 3 years, Breakside Brewery and Lewis & Clark College have partnered to offer a course in brewing and the business of beer for students interested in the craft beer industry. Sponsored by Lewis & Clark’s Center for Entrepreneurship, the course is instructed by Breakside brewmaster Ben Edmunds and R&D brewer Will Jaquiss. The course is a comprehensive introduction to the beer industry, designed to prepare students with a practical understanding of how beer is designed, developed, produced and sold. The course focuses on three intertwined elements of brewing: fermentation science, beer as a business, and beer as an artisan craft, and students develop a broad understanding of the skills and theory needed to understand and/or join the beer industry.

In the capstone project of the course students split into small groups and each brew a beer of their own design on Breakside’s 3 barrel pilot system. The students work closely with Breakside’s brewing staff to select raw materials, develop a recipe, and create a sales plan for the beer. In the final class of the semester, the beers are evaluated by brewers from other breweries in Portland, so the students get real-time feedback from sources other than their day-to-day instructors. Unlike other brewing seminars for students, these beers are actually sold to the public and marketed just like any of Breakside’s other beers.

Breakside and Lewis & Clark are excited to announce the release of this year’s three student-brewed beers.

The Beers:
Going Golden
American Summer Ale 5.3% ABV 22 IBUs
This hoppy golden ale is equally refreshing and complex. it features the new Enigma hop, which has notes of apricot and peach, as well as touch of Mosaic and Cascade hops.

Sunny Day Wit
Hoppy Belgian Wheat 4.1% ABV 15 IBU
This is an interpretation of a Belgian witbier with the addition of more flavoring and aroma hops than would be found in a classic version. The hard-to-find Huell Melon hop, featured here, provides beautiful notes of honeydew and grass.

Royal Baby
American ESB 5.8% ABV 35 IBU
An American take on the classic English-style ESB, with a spicy, citrus aroma from both English and American hops, and a rounded mouthfeel from the addition of Torrified Wheat.

Availability
All three beers will be available at Breakside’s two locations in late April and early May, until the batches run out.

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Visiting the Dekum Brewpub during CBC week https://www.breakside.com/visiting-the-dekum-brewpub-during-cbc-week/ Mon, 13 Apr 2015 22:00:57 +0000 https://www.breakside.com/?p=2763

Please make note of our updated hours during the week of Apr 13 to 19. The brewpub will be open: M: 3 to 10 T: 3 to 10 W: noon to 10 Th: noon to 10 Fr: noon to 11 St: noon to 11 Sn: noon to 10 We look forward to serving all the... Continue reading »

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Please make note of our updated hours during the week of Apr 13 to 19.

The brewpub will be open:
M: 3 to 10
T: 3 to 10
W: noon to 10
Th: noon to 10
Fr: noon to 11
St: noon to 11
Sn: noon to 10

We look forward to serving all the attendees of the 2015 Craft Brewers Conference!

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A perfect pairing: February 27 https://www.breakside.com/a-perfect-pairing-february-27/ Sat, 28 Feb 2015 00:18:19 +0000 https://www.breakside.com/?p=2498

This weekend at the Breakside Brewpub, we’re serving a Sonoran-Style Sausage that we think pairs perfectly with both, our Tropicalia and Nick’s Dunkel.   A bit about the food: We’re using Zenner’s double smoked sausage stuffed with bacon and cheddar, and topping it with a combination of (more) bacon, (more) cheddar, house salsa, a homemade... Continue reading »

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This weekend at the Breakside Brewpub, we’re serving a Sonoran-Style Sausage that we think pairs perfectly with both, our Tropicalia and Nick’s Dunkel.

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mmmmm, sausage

 

A bit about the food: We’re using Zenner’s double smoked sausage stuffed with bacon and cheddar, and topping it with a combination of (more) bacon, (more) cheddar, house salsa, a homemade avocado sauce, and cilantro.

With the Dunkel, Munich malts interplay perfectly with the bacon and sausage, combining smoke with sweet. We find that it harkens to a traditional German pairing of some of the spicier dogs with Munchener. Cheddar and Dunkel play well together.

As for the Tropicalia, it’s all about the heat! Some of the spice from Breakside’s house made salsa really bring forth the lychee fruit in the Tropicalia. We think the aji amarillo peppers in the beer help us to achieve the “Sanoran” side of our creation.

Either way you go, we think you’ll love it. Come on down this weekend and let us know what you think!

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Our night at the first annual Oregon Beer Awards. https://www.breakside.com/our-night-at-the-first-annual-oregon-beer-awards/ Wed, 25 Feb 2015 05:14:01 +0000 https://www.breakside.com/?p=2485

On the evening of February 23, the Doug Fir lounge hosted the first annual Oregon Beer Awards.  An event organized by Willammette Week, the ceremony seeks to recognize excellent work in the craft beer community.   Breakside received acclaim in 4 different categories: Bronze in best Sour or Wild ale for La Tormenta Silver in best... Continue reading »

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On the evening of February 23, the Doug Fir lounge hosted the first annual Oregon Beer Awards.  An event organized by Willammette Week, the ceremony seeks to recognize excellent work in the craft beer community.

 

Breakside received acclaim in 4 different categories:

Bronze in best Sour or Wild ale for La Tormenta

Silver in best IPA for Breakside IPA

Silver in best Brewpub experience

Gold in Brewery of the Year

 

The night was summed up nicely Alex Ganum, of Upright Brewing.  Accepting the honor of ‘Beer of the Year’ for his excellent Engelberg Pils.  Alex deflected the honor to his inspiration, Caldera Pilsner.  “When I first moved to Portland, Caldera Pilsner was the best German Pilsner I could find.”  His speech summed up the feeling of just about every brewer in the room.  From Widmer to Deschutes to Double Mountain to The Commons to Ex Novo, at some point an Oregon beer washed across their lips and into their dreams.

 

For the Breakside crew, we got a sense of that legacy by observing those in attendance.  Steve Jones of Cheese Bar, Jerome Chicvara of Maletis, Doug Rehberg of Widmer, amongst many new faces to the industry.  There was no sense of competition.  We were there to celebrate beer!

 

And in the end, beer was the real winner.  The individual awards are just validation for the hard work that goes into creation, reflection and repetition.  Each one, a mosaic of the hundreds of beers that poured before it.  In honor of that, we only hope to inspire some future beer, some future brewpub, some future brewery.

 

 

 

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Breakside Collaboration with Transition Projects https://www.breakside.com/breakside-collaboration-with-transition-projects/ Thu, 22 Jan 2015 21:34:05 +0000 https://www.breakside.com/?p=2263

It has been nearly 5 years since we first opened our doors in the Woodlawn neighborhood. We’ve made a lot of friends, become a part of some wonderful families, and have received a bounty of support from our loyal customers. Sometimes, it feels almost too good to be true. From this place of gratitude, we... Continue reading »

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It has been nearly 5 years since we first opened our doors in the Woodlawn neighborhood. We’ve made a lot of friends, become a part of some wonderful families, and have received a bounty of support from our loyal customers. Sometimes, it feels almost too good to be true.

From this place of gratitude, we bring news of our first major venture in volunteerism: a Breakside collaboration with Transition Projects.

Transition Projects has been serving the public good for over 40 years!  Through care and compassion, they have helped to transition Portland’s homeless population into housing.  The Bud Clark Commons buzzes, daily, with the tireless efforts of mentors and case managers, collaborating with families in need.

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Teamwork!

So, on a grey morning in December, we sent some of our staff to the Bud Clark Commons for volunteer work with the folks at Transition Projects.  The day was spent sorting and organizing the massive donations made in the lead up to the holidays.  We got an inside glimpse of a well run non-profit, and some quality team bonding!  That was only the beginning….

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Donation bin at our brewpub

For the month of February, the brewpub and the brewery will be accepting donations to Transition Projects.  Specifically, we’re looking for warm clothing, bedding, socks, towels, pillows, and hygiene products (unused).  You will see donation bins outside of our brewpub and in the tasting room of the brewery.  If you’re coming in for a pint, don’t forget to bring a donation!

Also, in February, we’ll be sending a staff of 8 servers and chefs to cook up a delicious meal for the Clark Center.  We’re still working on the menu, but are certain that 90 people will be well-fed on the evening of Feb 10.

Collaboration is at the heart of our industry.  Brewers gain inspiration from working with others and feeding off of their energy.  At Breakside, we realize that inspiration can come from anywhere.  And to those who are out there trying to better their life, and the lives of others- you are our inspiration.  Thank you.

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Our Hopstories Video https://www.breakside.com/our-hopstories-video/ Sat, 26 Jul 2014 21:45:11 +0000 https://www.breakside.com/?p=1957 Hopstories #7: Breakside Brewery from Eric Buist on Vimeo.

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Hopstories #7: Breakside Brewery from Eric Buist on Vimeo.

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How to Find Our New Taproom! https://www.breakside.com/how-to-find-our-new-taproom/ https://www.breakside.com/how-to-find-our-new-taproom/#respond Wed, 30 Jan 2013 16:14:30 +0000 https://www.breakside.com/?p=1432 Our new taproom in Milwaukie is opening on January 30, 2013. We’ve heard from some friends that the new location can be a little tricky to find, so we wanted to write out a set of simple directions. First, if you are coming from the West, Google Maps will tell you to turn on Freeman... Continue reading »

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Our new taproom in Milwaukie is opening on January 30, 2013. We’ve heard from some friends that the new location can be a little tricky to find, so we wanted to write out a set of simple directions.

First, if you are coming from the West, Google Maps will tell you to turn on Freeman Way. Do not do this!

 

Whether you are coming from the East or West on Highway 224, you want to exit at the Lake Road/Harmony Road off ramp. At the exit head north and drive to the first light.  This is International Way. Take a left at the light and then make an IMMEDIATE right turn into the first driveway. You will see a sign for Breakside Brewery. Drive about 100 yards through the parking lot, and our new brewery will be on your left!

Hope to see you there soon; cheers!

Ben

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83 Beers Later https://www.breakside.com/83-beers-later/ https://www.breakside.com/83-beers-later/#respond Tue, 01 Jan 2013 19:00:40 +0000 https://www.breakside.com/?p=1403 Now that we’ve officially rung in the New Year, we can close the books on our 2012 brewing logs and take stock of what the Breakside team has accomplished over the last twelve months. In 2011, we released 92 different beers. 2012’s total came in slightly lower at 83 beers; though, considering that we did... Continue reading »

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Now that we’ve officially rung in the New Year, we can close the books on our 2012 brewing logs and take stock of what the Breakside team has accomplished over the last twelve months. In 2011, we released 92 different beers. 2012’s total came in slightly lower at 83 beers; though, considering that we did more re-brews and built out a new brewery, this is still a pretty respectable number. Here are some interesting notes about those 83 beers:

  • 17 fall into the broad category of “American ales.” These include all of our hoppy Northwest-style IPAs and pale ales, our fresh hop beers, CDA and imperial red. As mentioned in one of my earlier blog posts, we did three different fresh hop beers this year, including the very popular Fresh Hop Citra Wheatwine.
  • We can’t keep pace with Cascade and their barrel releases, but we did release 12 beers this year that were 100% barrel-aged. If you count beers with barrel-aged components, or beers that were barrel fermented that number rises slightly. Most of these beers were released either around our 2nd anniversary back in May or at our bottle release and Winter Formal last month. To break it down even further, there were 3 gin barrel-aged beers, 7 bourbon barrel-aged beers, 1 from a Chinato barrel, and 1 beer that is wild fermented in neutral oak.
  • As for European-inspired brewing, we released 13 Belgian-style beers, 10 German-inspired beers, and 8 that come from the classic British brewing tradition. Looking at these numbers now, I’m surprised that we didn’t do more British ales this past year. Notably, we made no Scottish-style ales, nor any lower alcohol bitters or pale ales. Had it not been for Andrew Horne’s ESB in the fall, we would have failed to make any bitters at all!
  • And then there are the out-of-style beers. I’ve long maintained that our experimentation with non traditional fermentables and flavors in beer is just one component of what we do at Breakside, and I do bristle at the descriptions of Breakside that characterize us as a purely “experimental brewery.” That said, we made 23 different beers that can’t easily be categorized or that clearly violate the German Purity Law. Here is the complete list of adjuncts that made their way into our beers this year: espelette chile, salted caramel, sour cherries, lychee, counoise juice, maple caramel, fennel seed, pineapple, fatali peppers, aji cerezas, tarragon, sweet orange peel, chamomile, coriander, bitter orange peel, habanero peppers, serrano peppers, Dutch chocolate, cacao nibs, western red cedar tips, chestnuts, wildfire honey, lapsang souchong tea, lemongrass, tomatillo, Oregon sea salt, lavender, kaffir lime, galangal, coffee, rhubarb, strawberries, lemon peel, Colorado spruce tips, vanilla bean, star anise, cucumber, lime peel, sungold tomatoes, Genovese basil, Oregon wild plums, candy cap mushrooms, ginger, saffron, pumpkin, apples, coconut, dill flower, caraway, rosemary, hazelnuts, nutmeg, passionfruit and blueberries.

There were a few areas of beer world that we really didn’t get to explore in 2012, and I expect that we’ll be spending more time brewing more lagers and recreating historical styles in 2013. Indeed, with our new production facility ready to pump out a huge amount of beer this year, we’ll have a lot more flexibility to dedicated time and tank space to lagers. In January alone, we’ll be releasing three of them!

Now, what about favorites? First off, I think it’s important to mention that we do recognize that not all beers are created equal (nor are all beer styles), and there were some missteps amongst those 83 beers of 2012. Before I start patting Sam, Jacob, Andrew and myself on the back for a job well done, I think there are a few misses that are worth remembering. Here are the five beers we made in 2012 that you likely will not see again:

  • There were a handful of beers that we made that were damned by a flawed malt profile. Perhaps these beers shouldn’t make the ‘never again’ list, because really what they need is some fundamental changes. Our East Coast Pale Ale was a nice Cascade-driven hoppy beer that was marred by the false diacetyl flavors from Crystal 60L malts; International Way APA and the second version of our Newport Summer Ale both demonstrated why Simpsons Golden Promise is a better base malt in dark beers–the husky/grainy flavor was super unpleasant in such light bodied beers. And, Victory malt has been forever banned from use in our Belgian-style beers after it overtook the flavor profile of our Belgian Pale Ale. So, if these beers do re-emerge, expect to see them have entirely new malt flavors.
  • I am done with Gose, at least flavored ones, at least for a while. I love using salt to add complexity and mouthfeel to beers, but the Cucumber Gose and BLT Gose that we made this year both were disappointments. With gose, where the salt character is meant to be prominent, these beers quickly move into the territory of undrinkability, and we certainly were guilty of trying to use a neutral gose base as too much of an easy springboard for further experimentation. I do think that there’s some potential here, but if we make a gose in 2013 it will be a ‘plain’ one, and if I want to flavor it I’ll mix it with some Bloody Mary mix in a brunch cocktail rather than in a fermentor.
  •  Smoky Radler. Peated malt plus lemon peel. Not sure what we were thinking with that one.
  • Lavender Fudge Stout and Coffee Cream Stout. Both of these were ‘doctored’ versions of our dry stout, and they were demonstrations of how difficult it can be to balance flavors delicately when trying to ‘reverse engineer’ a beer. In the case of the LFS, the lavender-to-cacao ratio just skewed a little too much to lavender. The Coffee Cream Stout was proof that dry stout and coffee really should not be mixed.
  • My personal biggest miss in brewing this year was our Yakima Valley Sour Ale. This was brewed with the intention of being a ‘blueberry sour,’ and the beer was neither sour enough nor did any real blueberry character come through. On the upside, this beer did provide us with a fantastic way of culturing some bacteria and wild yeast that were later used (more successfully!) in our Passionfruit Berlinerweisse and the New World Bruin (currently in barrels, due for a May release).

Writing that is a good form of brewer’s catharsis. Now that I’ve expiated those 2012 beer sins, here is my highly personal list of our eight best beers this year:

8) Session Brown I wrote this recipe in June on a flight from Boise after judging at the North American Beer Awards and tasting through many milds and browns. It was fun to re-tool it for a few more batches in the summer, and then a wonderful surprise when it medaled at this year’s GABF.

7) Apizza Alt There were a number of beers that were part of our Chef Collaboration Series that were highlights for me over the past year, but the delight that this beer elicited from Brian Spangler of Apizza Scholls was a real validation of the entire project.

6) New Nordic Porter I was really satisfied by how well the dill, caraway, and fennel intermingled in this beer. This beer is my case that ‘experimental flavored beers’ can be drinkable, balanced, and complex. One of our riskier experiments this year (dill beer, really?) was one of my most pleasant surprises.

5) Smoked Apple Ale An idea that I’d been toying with for a long time came together really nicely: 200 pounds of free apples fell into our laps, and the guys at FH Steinbart were kind enough to let me press all of them in the rain on Election Night. The result: our fastest moving one off in Breakside history.

4) 1911 Vienna Coffee Beer Our senior brewer, Sam Barber knocked it out of the park with this beer that was a three way collaboration between Breakside, Saraveza, and Red E Coffee Roasters. The sweet, medium-bodied base beer complemented the lightly roasted, Ethiopian Yirgacheffe from Red E just beautifully. To me this was proof, that there’s a whole realm of lighter coffee beers waiting to be explored.

3) Gin IPA In the interest of full disclosure, I stole this idea directly from Ben Flerchinger at Lucky Lab. The name says it all: Breakside IPA went into an Old Tom Gin barrel from Ransom Spirits, got re-dry hopped in the barrel and then bottled. I’ve heard from some folks that these beers are still holding up beautifully, so you might want to try it now if you have any left from the 2nd Anniversary sale.

2) Cedarbaumbier We’ll be doing a lot more foraging in 2013, and western red cedar tips are at the top of the list of ‘crops’ to get again. There’s no beer that we make that is more “Oregonian” than this one, and I’m still impressed by the complex aromas–so similar to hops, yet distinct–that come from using tree tips.

1) Woodlawn Pale Ale What began as a project to re-tool our Hoppy Amber evolved into the creation of an entirely new, year-round beer. I’ve probably spent more time thinking about the recipe and execution of this beer than any other over the last eight months, and now it’s scaled up for 60 barrel production. Only 26 IBUs, and still one of the most hop forward beers we’ve ever made.

To those folks who came and tried one, some, many or all of our beers in 2013, thank you so much for your support. The rest of the brewery staff and I promise you more creativity, fun and deliciousness in the coming year! Onward to 2013 and a whole new set of beers!

Cheers,

Ben

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Jacob’s Update–The New Brewery and Some Holiday Beers! https://www.breakside.com/jacobs-update-the-new-brewery-and-some-holiday-beers/ https://www.breakside.com/jacobs-update-the-new-brewery-and-some-holiday-beers/#respond Tue, 27 Nov 2012 18:14:01 +0000 https://www.breakside.com/?p=1353 Hey folks, this post is kind of a random assortment of things going on at the brewery right now. Enjoy! A Brief Update on our Milwaukie Brewery Things are rapidly finishing up with construction at the new brewery.  We are a little past our original completion date because of a couple of construction hiccups with... Continue reading »

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Hey folks, this post is kind of a random assortment of things going on at the brewery right now. Enjoy!

A Brief Update on our Milwaukie Brewery

Things are rapidly finishing up with construction at the new brewery.  We are a little past our original completion date because of a couple of construction hiccups with our steam boiler, so our first brew is going to be pushed out a bit from what we originally thought.  We were hoping to be brewing in less than three weeks!  All of us are ready to jump onto the system as soon as it is ready.

Our new 30 barrel Metalcraft Fabrication brewhouse is beautiful, and is patiently waiting for us to put it to work. All of our fermentation and lagering tanks are getting piped and cleaned this week. Our first step, after a thorough cleaning, will be to move water through the whole system to make sure the piping goes where it is supposed to.  Once we have everything calibrated, it will be time to brew!  Look for the first beers off of the new system to be available in late December, and an update on how they are coming along as soon as we have anything to report. Our plan for the time being is to brew a one-off unfiltered lager (“New Milwaukie Lager,” of course!) as a calibration batch before starting to scale up recipes like Dry Stout, Pilsner, Woodlawn Pale and Session Brown. For you IPA fans, you’ll likely have to wait until early next year to see the first batch of Breakside IPA come out of the new place: our hop contracts on important varietals like Citra don’t go into effect until the first of January.

Two Strong Holiday Beers: Imperial Red and Imperial Stout

Even though we make a lot of different styles of beer at Breakside, I think that one of the areas where we tend to focus a little less is high gravity (ie high ABV) beer. So, it’s a little out of character for us to be releasing two ‘imperial’ beers over the next two weeks, but that’s exactly what we’re doing. Two weeks ago, we brewed our beer for this years Holiday Ale Fest, an Imperial Red Ale.  We decided to brew a collaboration with our friends at Lompoc Brewing.  Bryan Keilty from Lompoc, Ben, and I sat down, tasted through a few examples of the style, and designed a recipe which we are calling India Passion Elixir.  For the recipe we decided to include a touch of flaked rye, as well as some dark wheat malt, for a nice spicy flavor.  We also added a bit of wildfire honey to enhance the fruity malt character and fermentation esters. This is a very rich, complex honey that will add more depth to the finished beer.  We wanted to have a hop character that was both simple and big.  For this we used Centennial and Willamette hops from Yakima.  Willamette hops work well with the spicy rye character, and the Centennials lend a clean bitterness and burst of the delicious pine and citrus character that we all love. This red ale is going to be VERY hoppy at 80 IBU, most of which coming from aroma additions.  This will be a big, flavorful, hoppy beer perfect for the cold season.  Look for it at the Festival and our tasting room at the end of next week.

Last week we also brewed a new recipe for an Russian Imperial Stout that I designed.  This is a big, rich beer that will come in over 8% alcohol when it is done fermenting.  We will be putting a portion of it into a Buffalo Trace Bourbon barrel that currently has our Oatmeal Stout in it.  Using the barrel the second time will lend more of the flavors of the oak and a more restrained bourbon flavor without contributing any alcohol. The barrel is going to add a lot of complexity to the finished beer.

The Imperial Stout recipe is a relatively simple recipe.  The base is two very flavorful malts: Scottish Golden Promise and a bready American Munich.  Three different specialty roasted malts were used to contribute the rich chocolate and roast characters: Scottish roasted barley, German debittered black malt, and American chocolate malt.  I added some brown sugar for richness, as well as a flavor reminiscent of the caramelized sugar on top of creme brulee.  We also boiled longer than we normally do, in hopes to enhance the rich roasty character. We are hoping that this beer finishes very complex and deep.  It should be perfect for the wet, cold winter that looks to be headed our way.

A quick teaser…

We’re not just releasing ourselves to high octane seasonals over the next month. Keep an eye out for two experimental beers that Ben has been developing–one is our New Nordic Porter, a robust porter made with carraway, fennel pollen, dill pollen, and plums. This beer is inspired by the Scandinavian spirit aquavit and was made in collaboration with Jacob Grier, one of Portland’s top cocktail gurus. The other experimental beer is a Rosemary Winter Warmer made with hazelnuts and nutmeg. Writer Lucy Burningham is joining Ben in the brewhouse to develop this beer, which will coincide with the release of her new book Hop in the Saddle. All of the beers mentioned above will be available at some point in December…be sure to visit the pub and try one, or all, of them!

Cheers,
Jacob

The post Jacob’s Update–The New Brewery and Some Holiday Beers! appeared first on Breakside Brewery.

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